Activism

Councillor Anne Horn - #ScotWomenStand Role Model & Supporter

SNP Councillor for Kintyre and the Islands, in Argyll & Bute, Cllr Anne Horn is a highly active campaigner for equality, and the end of violence against women, as well as a supporter of renewable energy and sustainability for the Argyll & Bute communities.

*Content warning: Domestic abuse.*

Cllr Anne Horn, SNP, of Argyll & Bute.

Cllr Anne Horn, SNP, of Argyll & Bute.

I recall a defining moment at an early point in my career when I found myself on the path of a women whose story opened my eyes and clarified, within me, the feeling that I must use my voice for those who are unable, for many reasons, to find or use their own.

I found myself listening to a lady, who had recently fled her home, picked up her children barefooted from her garden and ran to safety in fear of her life at the hands of her husband. She was from a good home, her husband, a well-known and upstanding member of the community. Her children well dressed and well behaved. She had flown from her garden that day, not knowing quite where she would go. He had held a knife to her, she was no longer willing to stay silent and suffer.

At that point, I was inspired by her courage, her resolve and in all her vulnerability the strength she had found, within herself, to bring about change, to rescue herself and to begin to rebuild from a new beginning.

My own journey took a turn and I began to understand that I too had to find courage to use my voice in spaces where I could make a real difference.

Since becoming a councillor, every day has offered opportunity, often finding myself in corners, on behalf of individuals or my community, which are difficult. I brought some skills which have been useful but I’ve continually been building more. Diplomacy, tact, strength and discernment regularly feature in my work and I value the every present opportunity to work alongside others, recognising the skills and energy they bring and coming together to resolve issues and find ways to move forward.

I would encourage other women to go into local politics. There is a growing support network and it is very rewarding.

Alongside her role as Councillor, Cllr Horn is the Director of Tarbert & Skipness Community Trust, and an active member of both the Tarbert Youth Music Initative, and the Argyll and Bute VAW Multi Agency Partnership. Find out more about Cllr Anne Horn, including how to get in touch with her, on the Argyll & Bute Council website.

#TBTMightyWomen - Mary Barbour

Magistrate, local councillor and bailie are just a few titles that define this week’s #TBTMightyWomen profile. Mary Barbour started her journey as a political activist through the Kinning Park Co-operative Guild, leading to her spearheading the South Govan Women’s Housing Association at the time of the Glasgow Rent Strikes in the early 20th century.

In response to a 25% rent increase, proposed by private landlords, Barbour organised both eviction resistance protests and tenant committees. Here, she joined left-wing groups, like the Independent Labour Party and the Socialist Sunday School Movement. Barbour’s work quickly generated a lot of support which led to formation of ‘Mrs Barbour’s Army’[1].

Mary Barbour (Image Credit: The  Pearce Institute )

Mary Barbour (Image Credit: The Pearce Institute)

Alongside Agnes Dollan and Helen Crawfurd, Barbour [2] created the Women’s Peace Crusade (WPC) in 1916, at the Great Women’s Peace Conference. The group primarily campaigned for a negotiation settlement to WWI, with open air meetings that was unfortunately hindered through the development of a coalition government led by Lloyd George. WPC began to branch, and spread from Glasgow to all over Scotland, as well as England, campaigning until the end of the war.

In formal politics, Barbour assumed the position as the first women Bailie on Glasgow Corporation, alongside Mary Bell, as well as being appointed one of the first women Magistrates. Barbour was the Labour candidate for the Fairfield war in Govan, elected to Glasgow Town Council (one of the first woman councillors too!), and appointed as the Justice of the Peace commissioner for the City of Glasgow. Phew.

In between all of these incredible roles, Barbour also chaired the Glasgow Women’s Welfare and Advisory Clinic! This centre was the first of its kind in Scotland as it offered advice on birth control for women[3]!

220px-Mary_Barbour_Statue_-_Front_view.jpg

Moving to the modern day, Glasgow Women’s Library with Sharon Thomas created a monument in honour of Barbour, resulting in a resurgence of interest in her extensive work. Remember Mary Barbour Association then formed and campaigned for the creation of a statue in Barbour’s honour, which was completed in March last year (making it the fourth statue of a woman in the entirety of Glasgow…).

Check out these links:

-        https://remembermarybarbour.wordpress.com/mary-barbour-rent-strike-1915/

-        http://dangerouswomenproject.org/2017/03/02/mary-barbour-dangerous-woman/

-        https://party.coop/2018/03/08/mary-barbour-honoured-on-international-womens-day/


[1] http://www.acumfaegovan.com/govan-history/mary-barbour

[2] The Biographical Dictionary of Scottish Women. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 2007. p. 2

[3] Birth Control Local Clinic Opens for Married Women". The Govan Press. 1926-08-13