In 2019 Scotland’s Women Stand is an ambitious project that offers support to women in scotland who are interested in getting involved in politics and participative democracy, whatever their experience level.

#TBTMightyWomen - Mary Barbour

#TBTMightyWomen - Mary Barbour

Magistrate, local councillor and bailie are just a few titles that define this week’s #TBTMightyWomen profile. Mary Barbour started her journey as a political activist through the Kinning Park Co-operative Guild, leading to her spearheading the South Govan Women’s Housing Association at the time of the Glasgow Rent Strikes in the early 20th century.

In response to a 25% rent increase, proposed by private landlords, Barbour organised both eviction resistance protests and tenant committees. Here, she joined left-wing groups, like the Independent Labour Party and the Socialist Sunday School Movement. Barbour’s work quickly generated a lot of support which led to formation of ‘Mrs Barbour’s Army’[1].

Mary Barbour (Image Credit: The  Pearce Institute )

Mary Barbour (Image Credit: The Pearce Institute)

Alongside Agnes Dollan and Helen Crawfurd, Barbour [2] created the Women’s Peace Crusade (WPC) in 1916, at the Great Women’s Peace Conference. The group primarily campaigned for a negotiation settlement to WWI, with open air meetings that was unfortunately hindered through the development of a coalition government led by Lloyd George. WPC began to branch, and spread from Glasgow to all over Scotland, as well as England, campaigning until the end of the war.

In formal politics, Barbour assumed the position as the first women Bailie on Glasgow Corporation, alongside Mary Bell, as well as being appointed one of the first women Magistrates. Barbour was the Labour candidate for the Fairfield war in Govan, elected to Glasgow Town Council (one of the first woman councillors too!), and appointed as the Justice of the Peace commissioner for the City of Glasgow. Phew.

In between all of these incredible roles, Barbour also chaired the Glasgow Women’s Welfare and Advisory Clinic! This centre was the first of its kind in Scotland as it offered advice on birth control for women[3]!

220px-Mary_Barbour_Statue_-_Front_view.jpg

Moving to the modern day, Glasgow Women’s Library with Sharon Thomas created a monument in honour of Barbour, resulting in a resurgence of interest in her extensive work. Remember Mary Barbour Association then formed and campaigned for the creation of a statue in Barbour’s honour, which was completed in March last year (making it the fourth statue of a woman in the entirety of Glasgow…).

Check out these links:

-        https://remembermarybarbour.wordpress.com/mary-barbour-rent-strike-1915/

-        http://dangerouswomenproject.org/2017/03/02/mary-barbour-dangerous-woman/

-        https://party.coop/2018/03/08/mary-barbour-honoured-on-international-womens-day/


[1] http://www.acumfaegovan.com/govan-history/mary-barbour

[2] The Biographical Dictionary of Scottish Women. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 2007. p. 2

[3] Birth Control Local Clinic Opens for Married Women". The Govan Press. 1926-08-13

#FBFMightyWomen- Agnes Agnew Hardie

#FBFMightyWomen- Agnes Agnew Hardie

Jenny Marr - #ScotWomenStand Role Model & Supporter

Jenny Marr - #ScotWomenStand Role Model & Supporter